A seminar to explore existing and potential modes and methodologies of creative data visualisation both of and in the city.

The Building City Dashboards Project is pleased to announce that it will be hosting its first research seminar: Urban Data and Media Art. The seminar will take place on the 28th of August, 2017, in Room 2.31, Iontas Building, North Campus, Maynooth University, Maynooth, Kildare. You are invited to register for attend the event (for free) on the project Eventbrite page below. The seminar will begin at 11 am with talks from Dr. Maria Mencia, Dr. Marcos Dias, and Camille Dongan.

 

https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/urban-data-and-media-art-tickets-37239904557

 

Dr. Maria Mencia (@mariaFmencia) is a media artist/e-poet, practice-based researcher and teaches in the School of Performance and Screen Studies at Kingston University (London, UK) where she is also an executive committee member of The Creative Process Research Unit . Mencía is a pioneer in digital poetry and her PhD in Digital Poetics and Digital Art at Chelsea College of Arts, University of the Arts-London (2000-2003), was one of the first doctorates in the field of electronic literature. She studied English Philology at the Complutense University in Madrid, Fine Art & Design and History and Theory of Art at the University of the Arts London. Her practice-based research is at the intersection of language, art and digital technology. It explores multimodal digital textualities, digital media grammars, virtual poetic spaces and the reader’s/viewer’s engagement. It is trans-disciplinary, bringing together different cultural, artistic and literary traditions such as: linguistics, translation, fine art, visual, concrete and sound poetry, with digital poetics, electronic writing, creative programming, interaction and interface design, new media art theories and practices. Her practice includes interactive digital media installations, performances, web-based works, sound-generated poems, interactive generative narratives and data visualisation poetics. She is an Executive Member of the Electronic Literature Organization Board of Directors (ELO).

 

Dr. Marcos Dias (@mpdias) is a lecturer in Media Studies and co-coordinator of the Masters (MA) in Critical and Creative Media in Maynooth University. He graduated from the School of Culture and Communication in the University of Melbourne in 2015 with a PhD in Media Studies. Marcos’s PhD thesis is a multidisciplinary investigation of the social and spatial impact of digital technologies in the contemporary mediated city through ethnographic research on Blast Theory’s participatory art project A Machine To See With. His main research focus is the analysis of contemporary social and spatial exchanges mediated by digital technologies in urban space. His educational background includes a BA in Architecture and City Planning (University of Sao Paulo), a BA in Digital Media Design and Production (Letterkenny Institute of Technology) and a MSc in Interactive Digital Media (Trinity College). Marcos has previously worked as an architect and web designer and he was an Editorial Board Member of the Platform Journal of Media and Communications (2010-2011).

 

Camille Dongan (@VRCamillecom) is a Virtual Reality consultant and content producer with 15 year parallel careers in both technology and the arts (theatre, film, radio). Since discovering Virtual Reality 2 ½ years ago, and realising the potential for this immersive medium, she has been researching and developing concepts for how Virtual Reality can impact our experiences at work and at play. Camille runs VR and AR (Augmented Reality) talks and workshops for clients across a variety of sectors including entertainment, fintech, design and academia. Camille runs a VR meetup called VR Community Ireland where a group of artists, technologists, psychologists, academics and VR enthusiasts meet up to explore the new storytelling possibilities presented by VR and AR. Camille works as a creative tech producer with vStream where she produces AR and VR applications for brands.

 

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